the sun never sets on lucille ball

Lucille Ball with her niece, Pamela, circa 1950.

Lucille Ball with her niece, Pamela, circa 1950.


Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz photographed at the 1953 Emmy Awards.


Lucille Ball photographed circa 1940. 

Lucille Ball photographed circa 1940. 


Lucille Ball’s personal photographs of her various vacations, 1960s. 


Lucy and Ethel go to charm school.

"I kept waiting for Ethel to say trick or treat!"




Lucille Ball with a kitten, circa 1940. Lucy kept  five cats at her 1930s residence, and six cats on her ranch with Desi. In her autobiography, she wrote, “Cats I admire because of their independence. ‘So you’re home again, who gives a damn?’ my cats seem to be saying when I walk in the door.” 

Lucille Ball with a kitten, circa 1940. Lucy kept  five cats at her 1930s residence, and six cats on her ranch with Desi. In her autobiography, she wrote, “Cats I admire because of their independence. ‘So you’re home again, who gives a damn?’ my cats seem to be saying when I walk in the door.” 


"…The sun never sets on Lucille Ball. All over this worried world tonight, nations of untold millions are watching reruns they also watched the first time around. Joy requires no translation. God wanted the world to laugh, and He invented you."

        august 6th, 1911 - april 26, 1989 



“While I was growing up, she tried to keep our lives simple in the midst of what was going on, tried to let us have a real life…I just saw her as my mother. She wasn’t really a disciplinarian or a taskmaster…She had a lot of old fashioned values that she got from her mother. My parents always said there’s a lot more to life than how much money you have or how to impress people…We were really very close in those later years, we were able to say everything we needed to say to each other. All along she said, ‘What is important in life is to be happy and enjoy your life and have a good relationship with somebody.’ She wanted to have a happy life. She did the best she could.”


- Desi Arnaz, Jr. on his mother 

“While I was growing up, she tried to keep our lives simple in the midst of what was going on, tried to let us have a real life…I just saw her as my mother. She wasn’t really a disciplinarian or a taskmaster…She had a lot of old fashioned values that she got from her mother. My parents always said there’s a lot more to life than how much money you have or how to impress people…We were really very close in those later years, we were able to say everything we needed to say to each other. All along she said, ‘What is important in life is to be happy and enjoy your life and have a good relationship with somebody.’ She wanted to have a happy life. She did the best she could.”

- Desi Arnaz, Jr. on his mother 


Lucille Ball feeding chickens at her ranch, 1940s.

Lucille Ball feeding chickens at her ranch, 1940s.